Natural remedies to get rid of geographic tongue fast

Natural remedies to get rid of geographic tongue fast

Geographic tongue is irregular patches that resemble a map on one's tongue, that is why people called the condition that name. You may not feel pain a

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Geographic tongue is irregular patches that resemble a map on one’s tongue, that is why people called the condition that name. You may not feel pain at all in the area where the spot is located on your tongue.

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Also, the patches usually appear, on the top and sides of the tongue.

First, before I list all the remedies and natural treatment let us understand what causes this tongue problem and the symptoms that may emerge.

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Symptoms Geographic tongue

Your dentist can easily detect this tongue disease easily during an oral examination or a dental checkup.

Although you may not detect this condition earlier run, in fact, you may not notice it for like a year or more if you are the type that doesn’t go for check up as recommended by ADA

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Geographic tongue features include:

  • You may notice patches in every area of your tongue.
  • The patches may be of different sizes and shapes.
  • Patches that heal on is own and migrate to another different part of the tongue.
  • You may notice a smooth or red spot on the top and side of the tongue. Also, you may notice a patch that lasts up to a year at a time.

At times some food may trigger this condition and cause Additional symptoms like mild pain and discomfort. Other symptoms include:

  •  smoking
  • chewing tobacco
  • spicy or acidic foods
  • hot food
  • Kind of toothpaste
  • Some mouthwash

Home remedies for Geographic tongue

The geographic tongue will heal on is own, but there are home remedies and treatment that relieve pain, reduce discomfort, and cure the infection.

These include:

  1. Mint oil

Mint oil is often used in toothpaste, gum, candy, and beauty products. It is a natural anti-microbial agent and breath freshener that promote good oral hygiene.

Simply brush your mouth with the paste two times daily for 2 weeks after switch over no your regular toothpaste.

  1. Baking soda scrub

Apply a small amount of kitchen baking soda to your toothbrush and scrub your tongue, teeth, and your gums. It helps to reduce the bacteria that cause a geographic tongue.

In a small study, they find out that these harmful bacteria that always cause infection in our mouth, such as streptococcus and Candida was killed by bicarbonate of soda.

  1. Tongue scraping

Gently scraping the tongue from back to front may also help reduce and remove the bacteria and debris that settle in the mouth.

  1. Aloe Vera

According to research, Aloe is a very powerful anti-inflammatory and as the healing potential. That makes it an effective remedy in treating different types of tongue disease, including the geographic tongue.

Also, it helps get rid of bad breath.

  • Apply the gel to your tongue or simply extract the liquid from the leaf and apply. Also, leave it for 10 minutes before rinsing it off with lukewarm water. Use it two times daily.
  • Alternatively, rinse your mouth 2 to 3 times daily with the Use of aloe vera juice.
  1. Vitamin B and Zinc supplements

The journal of dental medicine highlights that zinc effective in promoting healthy epithelial tissues and in the treatment of geographic tongue.

That means that if you have Zinc deficiency you might as well end up with the geographic tongue and other oral problems.

As from today start taking zinc supplement or eat more zinc-rich foods to get rid of the geographic tongue for life. Also, zinc promotes a proper and improved sense of taste and smell too.

Some food that is high in zinc includes:

  • like red meat
  • fish
  • oysters
  • crab
  • milk
  • cheese
  • beans
  • lentils
  • nuts
  • seeds
  • yogurt, kefir, spinach, and other green leafy vegetables.

Also, Zinc supplements come in several forms that are available online: tablets, capsules, and lozenges. Get in touch with your health care provider in your area to prescribe the right dosage for you.

Geographic tongue causes

In recent time, science as discovers that other conditions like psoriasis may link to the geographic tongue. But not enough evidence to support the claim. Although, there is no specific cause of geographic tongue.

But the researchers said that there are two known risk factors for geographic tongue. These include:

  • One is fissured tongue, a condition where the tongue has grooves all along the surface. 
  • Secondly, genetics, as the condition may be passed down from one generation to the next.

Geographic tongue treatment

Geographic tongue may clear away totally without any treatment at all if you don’t notice you have it, and you may not suffer from any symptoms or ill effects. Also, note that if you have been treated it may reoccur again.

I have mentioned some natural remedies for this type of tongue disease. Other treatments for geographic tongue include:

  • anesthetic and antihistamine mouthwash
  • oral pain relievers
  • corticosteroid rinses

Outlook

You can live your normal life With geographic tongue without any problem. But the appearance and mild discomfort may be a great concern for you. Luckily, the patches may disappear on its own without any medical treatment or home remedies.

There is nothing you need to do to prevent the condition from appearing again in the near future other than avoiding too acidic or spicy foods and other substance that might trigger it. However, you may try one of these home remedies to get rid of the geographic tongue (they are considered safe).

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All the tips mentioned here are strictly informational. This site does not provide medical advice. Consult with your dentist or other health care provider before using any of these tips or treatments.

 

REFERENCES

Honarmand, M., Mollashahi, L. F., Shirzaiy, M., & Sehhatpour, M. (2013). Geographic tongue and associated risk factors among Iranian dental patients. Iranian Journal of Public Health, 42 (2), 215. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3595651/

Ishibashi, M., Tojo, G., Watanabe, M., Tamabuchi, T., Masu, T., & Aiba, S. (2010). Geographic tongue treated with topical tacrolimus. Journal of Dermatological Case Reports4 (4), 57–59. Retrieved from http://doi.org/10.3315/jdcr.2010.1058

Nandini, D. B., Bhavana, S. B., Deepak, B. S., & Ashwini, R. (2016). Paediatric geographic tongue: A case report, review and recent updates. Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research10 (2), ZE05–ZE09. Retrieved from http://doi.org/10.7860/JCDR/2016/16452.7191

Picciani, B. L. S., Domingos, T. A., Teixeira-Souza, T., Batista dos Santos, V. de C., Fernando de Sousa Gonzaga, H., Cardoso-Oliveira, J., … Carneiro, S. (2016). Geographic tongue and psoriasis: Clinical, histopathological, immunohistochemical and genetic correlation – a literature review. Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia91 (4), 410–421. Retrieved from http://doi.org/10.1590/abd1806-4841.20164288

 

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