Having Clumpy Discharge After Taking Fluconazole? | Find out what this means and if it is normal

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Having clumpy discharges from the vagina usually happens due to vaginal yeast infection, which is also sometimes called vulvovaginal candidiasis, and this happens when the healthy yeast that normally lives in your vagina grows out of control.

If your vaginal chemistry gets thrown off balance, the normal yeast that lives in your vagina can grow too much and lead to an infection.

When this happens, drugs like Fluconazole are prescribed to you to help treat these yeast infections.

But why do people still keep having clumpy discharge after taking Fluconazole? Is it that Fluconazole didn’t work for them? Or is their body chemistry different?

In today’s article, we will be addressing the issue of why you are having clumpy discharge after taking Fluconazole, what it means, and if it is normal.

Read on.

 

Firstly, let's discuss Fluconazole?

FLUCONAZOLE - Healthsoothe

Fluconazole (Diflucan) is a popular yeast infection treatment. Yeast infection medicines need a prescription and are not accessible over-the-counter (OTC).

Fluconazole works by reducing the development of the fungus responsible for the infection.

Uses of Fluconazole

It is used to treat fungal infections, such as yeast infections of the vagina, mouth, throat, esophagus (the tube that connects the mouth to the stomach), abdomen (the region between the chest and the waist), lungs, blood, and other organs.

Side effects of Fluconazole 

You have to also know the side effects of Fluconazole to possibly know why you have any problem when taking the drug like still having clumpy discharge after taking Fluconazole.

Common and mild side effects of Fluconazole

The more common side effects of Fluconazole oral tablets depend on how much of the drug you need to take.

These side effects can include stomach pains, unusual food taste, nausea, headache, severe rash (in people with weak immune system), vomiting, dizziness, and diarrhea.

These are mild and common side effects of Fluconazole, and they may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks, if they persist or gets severe, consult your doctor or pharmacist as soon as possible.

Serious side effects of Fluconazole

Serious side effects can include the following:

  • Heart conditions that can be life-threatening). Symptoms are; fainting, arrhythmia, palpitations, seizures, and spurt of dizziness. Terfenadine, when combined with fluconazole at doses of 400 mg or higher, can cause a life-threatening heart rhythm condition called torsades de pointes.
  • Issues with the adrenal gland. Symptoms include appetite loss, stomach pains, tiredness, and muscular atrophy (weakness of the muscles).
  • Liver damage. Symptoms can include dark-colored urine, nausea, light-colored extracts, severe itching of the skin, jaundice, and vomiting.
  • Severe rash and peeling skin in people with cancer or AIDS. This mainly happens to people whose immune system is low, like sicklers.

Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call your emergency response number or your healthcare provider if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Other negative effects of this medication are possible. If you have any odd issues while using this drug, contact your doctor.

If you are in the United States or Canada, you may contact the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 to report adverse effects.

Drug interactions of fluconazole

Products that may interact negatively with this fluconazole include clopidogrel, pimozide, quinidine, and macrolide antibiotics (such as erythromycin), among others.

Taking the above products can cause you to still have clumpy recharge after taking fluconazole, so avoid them. 

Always confirm with your doctor to know what substances to avoid when taking fluconazole, to avoid being in the league of those who complain of still having clumpy discharge after taking fluconazole.

 

What will happen if you miss significant doses of Fluconazole and what do I do?

Nothing much will happen. Just that if you have missed significant doses of the drug, it will not be effective or potent enough to treat you for the ailment you took it for.

Do the following if you have missed dose on significant doses;

  • If you forget to take one or more doses: take your next dose at the usual time and in the average amount. Do not take any more than your doctor prescribed.
  • If you miss one dose, skip it and continue with your normal schedule.
  • Do not increase the dosage to catch up with the missed doses.
  • You should consult your doctor on what to do if you don’t know what to do.

 

What will happen if you overdose on Fluconazole and what do I do?

If you overdose on Fluconazole, then expect to get negative results. This can even lead to you still having clumpy discharge after taking Fluconazole.

Overdosing on Fluconazole can lead to certain problems associated with the liver, skin, heart, and adrenal gland.

If you or someone close to you has an overdose on Fluconazole, consult your physician or pharmacist immediately.

 

Why am I still having a clumpy discharge after taking Fluconazole?

Having Clumpy Discharge After Taking Fluconazole - Healthsoothe

So why are you still having clumpy discharge after taking Fluconazole? Check the following reasons to see why;

  • Not taking Fluconazole as prescribed or instructed: Well, the major cause of you having a clumpy discharge after taking Fluconazole is taking the medication wrongly or not taking Fluconazole as prescribed/instructed. 
  • Incompatibility: Another reason for you having a clumpy discharge after taking Fluconazole is if Fluconazole isn’t compatible with you. You must always make sure to consult your doctor before taking medications like these because there are certain conditions like pregnancy in which you shouldn’t take Fluconazole. 
  • Allergies and differences in body systems: Our body systems are not the same. Because Fluconazole works for someone you know, that doesn’t mean it will work for everyone, including you. You still have a clumpy discharge after taking Fluconazole either because your body system is allergic to the constituent(s) of Fluconazole or the yeast infection you have is resistant to Fluconazole. Sometimes other yeast infections medications might be the solution to stopping your clumpy recharge, and not Fluconazole. 
  • Ailments/diseases: The key point is always to make sure to consult with your doctor before commencing Fluconazole. Your doctor will perform some diagnostics to check whether Fluconazole will work for you. He/she can check underlying ailments that possibly diminish the action of Fluconazole.
  • Drug Interactions: Your doctor can also check to see the type of meds or drugs you are currently taking to see if they are interacting negatively with Fluconazole, to determine whether you should stop taking these drugs or prescribe another yeast infection drug for you which have minimal drug interactions.

Fluconazole drug interactions can render fluconazole pointless or ineffective, thereby causing you to continue to have a clumpy discharge after taking fluconazole.

So avoid taking substances that react negatively with fluconazole to get what you want from the drug.

Fluconazole usually begins to work within 24 hours.

Still, it may take up to three days for your symptoms to improve and up to seven days for the distinctive thick, white, or clumpy vaginal discharge to subside entirely, but this will only happen if you have checked out on the above points I have identified that causes you to have clumpy discharge after taking fluconazole.

Always make sure to check with a professional doctor before taking medications like fluconazole, to get the most out of any medication you take, or get the most suitable medication for you. 

 

What different kinds of vaginal discharge may mean

Differences in your vaginal fluids could mean you have an infection or other health condition.

If you suddenly have much more vaginal fluid than you normally do, it may be a sign of a problem.

Color is also important. Bright yellow or green discharge could be a concern. Thick, clumped, or chunky discharge (like cottage cheese) or extra watery discharge can also mean something is amiss.

Some other signs of infection include:

  • Itching, discomfort, or rash
  • Burning when you urinate
  • Blood when it’s not time for your period
  • A foul odor

If the discharge is whitish to pale yellow and thick and clumped, and you have vaginal itching or burning, you may have a yeast infection.

If the discharge is heavier than usual, watery, and grayish with a fishy odor, you may have bacterial vaginosis.

If discharge suddenly increases and is green or yellow with a bad odor—or is causing other symptoms—you should see your healthcare provider.

If you notice changes like these, talk to your healthcare provider to see what's going on.

 

How should Fluconazole be used to avoid clumpy discharge after taking Fluconazole? (Warnings and precautions)      

Fluconazole is available as a tablet and a liquid solution for oral use. It is typically taken once a day, either with or without meals.

You may only need one dosage of fluconazole, or you may need to take it for many weeks or more. The duration of your medication is determined by your illness and how well you react to fluconazole. 

The following are warnings and precautions that you must observe or follow to avoid having clumpy discharge after taking fluconazole;

  • Follow the instructions on your prescription label exactly, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to clarify any parts you don't understand. Fluconazole should be taken precisely as prescribed. Do not take more or less of it, or take it more often than your doctor has suggested.
  • On the first day of treatment, your doctor may instruct you to take a double dosage of fluconazole. Follow these instructions exactly.
  • Shake the drink well before each use to ensure that the medicine is properly distributed.
  • During the first several days of fluconazole treatment, you should begin to feel better. Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve or worsen.
  • Fluconazole should not be taken if you are pregnant.
  • Do not have vaginal or oral sex or insert anything into your vagina until you have completed your therapy and your infection has cleared up. Friction during sex might aggravate the condition or make it more difficult to heal. Furthermore, certain vaginal treatments including oil, might cause condoms to break.
  • Even if you feel better, keep taking fluconazole until your doctor instructs you to stop. Do not discontinue fluconazole without first consulting your doctor. If you stop taking fluconazole too soon, your infection may return quickly.
  • Even though yeast infections may be quite uncomfortable, avoid scratching. It might aggravate inflammation or create skin wounds, which can transfer germs and lead to further illness. You may apply over-the-counter lotions on your vulva to assist relieve inflammation. Your doctor may also advise you on how to relieve burning and itching. 

 

A Word from Healthsoothe

Yeast infection pills and OTC topical medications are both very effective treatments for yeast infections.

While both work similarly well in rebalancing candida in the vagina, many people prefer yeast infection pills like Fluconazole because they’re easier to use and only require one dose.

Fluconazole is one of the most common yeast infection treatment pills, but it requires a prescription. If you have symptoms of a yeast infection, talk to your healthcare provider to help you determine which treatment option might be best for you.

Vaginas secrete fluids that change over the course of a month. These fluids keep the vagina clean and well-lubricated. They can also tell you a lot about what stage of the menstrual cycle your body is in.

Healthy vaginal fluids are generally clear or milky-looking. They are mostly water and don't have a strong smell.

You may have an infection or another health condition if your vaginal fluids change in color, consistency, or odor in ways that aren't normal for you.

If you notice these changes, talk to a healthcare provider to see what's causing the differences. If you have an infection, you may need prescription medication.

Knowing what your normal fluids are like and what indicates a problem is important at any age. Become familiar with your body's ebbs and flows. And be sure to consult your healthcare provider if you notice any changes.

 

Frequently Asked Questions     

What should normal vaginal discharge look like?

Vaginal discharge normally varies throughout the month. A healthy vagina continually secretes fluids that lubricate the vagina and vulva.

Normal vaginal discharge helps clean the vagina by removing old cells. It can be clear or milky looking and should not have a strong odor.

What does discharge from a yeast infection look like?

A yeast infection causes thick, clumpy, white, or pale yellow discharge that is commonly accompanied by itching and burning sensations.

If you have never had a yeast infection before or if you are uncertain whether you have a yeast infection, see your healthcare provider.

Yeast infections are very common and can be treated with over-the-counter medications.

Can I use vaginal discharge to predict ovulation?

Yes. The vaginal discharge becomes wet, stretchy, and slippery during ovulation and resembles raw egg whites.

If you are trying to become pregnant, having sex when you notice this discharge will give you the best chance of pregnancy.

If you are trying to avoid pregnancy, you should use protection or abstain from sex when you have ovulation discharge.

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Odudu Abasi Mkpong
Odudu Abasi Mkpong
I am a freelance writer and a computer techie who is adept in content writing, copy writing, article writing, essay writing, journal writing, blog posts, seminar presentation, SEO contents, proof reading, plagiarism checking, editing webpage contents&write-ups and WordPress management. My work mantra is: "I can, and I will"
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